Watch Out

Most people, especially highly gifted people, do not really know where they belong until they are well past their mid-twenties.” –Β in Managing Oneself, by Peter F. Drucker

Were you as relieved as me, when you read the above quote by “the founder of modern management” Peter Drucker? Not only does he legitimize career uncertainty, he even acknowledges that it can be a sign of brightness. Oh, happy day!

It’s not exactly like I don’t know what I want to do in life. It’s just that I sometimes question whether I am in the right place to do “it”… Oh, and whether I want to keep doing “it” for the rest of my life… Although life is long, it is also very short! Especially with the decades of education we have to go through nowadays. Good thing modern medicine seems to be prolonging our lives with an equal amount of years, I guess.

This uncertainty is one of the many reasons that I am so grateful for the coaches in my life. As previously mentioned, my coaches help me confront and discuss questions about my career, motivations, values, etc., which are crucial aspects when defining my desired future.

At the moment, my coach and I are working on defining my strengths, to subsequently utilize them to achieve my goals. As Peter Drucker states: “a person can perform only from strength. One cannot build performance on weaknesses…

InΒ his article “Managing Oneself”, he further raises some of the questions, I am discussing with my coach:

  • Am I a reader or a listener?
  • How do I learn?
  • Do I work well with people, or am I a loner?
  • How do I produce results, as a decision maker or as an advisor?
  • Do I perform well under stress, or do I need a structured and predictable environment?
  • Do I work best in a big organization or a small one?
  • What are my values?

Come on, now, have a go at the above questions yourself! And if you are interested in learning more about Managing Oneself, read Peter Drucker’s article πŸ™‚

 

Your Future is in the Present

Hello, and welcome back. I hope you have had a wonderful summer! My summer has been great and sunny, and involved a lot of inspiration and thinking about the future of the #Busbeesblog. Now, I am fully recharged and ready to get back into my daily routines (i.e. involuntarily stop eating excessive amounts of chocolate and fast food every day).

The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho

The Alchemist is one of my favourite books, and the quote above has been imprinted on my mind since I read it. This quote motivates me to pursue and engage in good intentions, every day. I have personally witnessed how my thoughts eventually materialize into actions, and how – over time – these actions become habits.Β According to Will Durant, “you are what you repeatedly do“. By extension, you become what you repeatedly do. In that sense, our minds have significant power in taking us to our future. That is, the future we visualize and pursue for ourselves.

When we strive to become better than we are, everything around us becomes better too.The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho

My aim for this fall is to work on implementing new good habits, to achieve my formally (aka scribbled down on a napkin..) formulated goals, in the hopes that preparation meeting opportunity will lead to great achievements. For instance, I have thought about how to optimize my Hour of Powers, which books to read, and established a personal budget. I have also been working on a new evening routine, which you can read more about tomorrow.

Have you thought about your goals for the fall semester? And how to achieve them? If not, check out Mind ToolsΒ for inspiration on how to set and reach SMART goals. Happy reading!

Speak no ill

Benjamin Franklin quote

Like everyone else, I guess, I enjoy receiving compliments. However, I’ve recently discovered that there is one type of compliments, I do not enjoy: the ones that compliment me by criticizing others.

For instance, “your speech was so much better than the other speeches tonight“. I understand this is meant as a compliment, and that I should appreciate winning the “award” for best speech that night – and that no intentional harm is probably meant. However, such compliment makes me feel uncomfortable and bad on the other speech givers’ behalf. After all, I am sure they did the best they could and they meant well by giving a speech.

So, in the future I will avoid giving compliments like these – and I hope you will too Β : )